The epic tale of the University of Wisconsin LaCrosse Printmaking Program. The Printmaking program is directed by Joel Elgin and features the odd collection of the many PrintFools who enroll, print and exist from semester to semester in the Shop of Tears.

Friday, October 14, 2016

Frances Myers: 1936 – 2014


PrintFools, 

I'm hoping you recall the Frances Myers prints we saw on last weeks epic field trip to Madison.

 
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Frances Myers, Les faveurs de Dieu,
1993. Etching, 36 x 29 ½ inches. 

 
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Frances Myers Martrydom  
Color woodcut

Frances  was a GIANT in the printmaking world and a couple of printfools left UWL to do graduate work with her at UW.

 Watch this little movie about her, playing close attention to her subject:


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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7WaVRHCNvLA


And, those wood cut tools are getting as dull as... (fill in the blank).

Tool sharpening:
  https://www.facebook.com/539288466158348/videos/vb.539288466158348/947737495313441/?type=2&theater 


And, Babies - watch this to learn how the figures that guard the shop were printed...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EFIuba-34FQ


JE



11 comments:

Lauren Follansbee said...

I didn't know we "hand printed" those giant printshop god prints. Can we do a giant one and throw the old microwave at it? Also, Frances Myers prints are incredible, is the Les Faveurs de Dieu monotype and/or chine cole?! The layered images really contribute to the dimensional aesthetic.

Molly Lawler said...

Wow...a 45 piece series?? That's incredible. I love how Frances Myers utilizes layering and the look it is able to give off. I also really like her technique of "reduction" where she starts with a bunch of ideas and slowly narrows it down. I'm still upset that I missed out on the field trip...

Julia Mielke said...

Frances Myers seems to really like the look of symmetry. I like her choice of hues that she uses in her work.

Harold Lee said...

I always wondered how does those two giant hang outside the print shop came from... now the video explained it all. It's really interesting and fascinating to watch the technique on printing by hand.

Monica Bergs said...

I LOVE watching how those huge woodcuts were made. That was CRAZY! I greatly appreciate the effort that was put into the slow-mo of the dancer with the ink roller. Thank you for sharing that video!

Britani Bahr said...

I think its so cool how those giant wood cuts were made, and it was really cool being able to watch it! I saw those everyday walking to class and now knowing the story behind how they were made makes me look and appreciate it in a different way!

Britani Bahr said...

I think its so cool how those giant wood cuts were made, and it was really cool being able to watch it! I saw those everyday walking to class and now knowing the story behind how they were made makes me look and appreciate it in a different way!

Gemma Zahradka said...

I really liked what Frances Myers said about how the nuance of a piece can be so easily lost, so she just makes what she makes and tries to worry less about the perception of it. I think about how pieces will be perceived a lot, I guess because I worry that they won't make sense if the context is lost.

Megan Baker said...

I had NO IDEA those guardians were a class project using the wee little tools we have. I wish we would do something similar this semester or the next. Frances Myers has some cool concepts with layers and connecting the series.

Tyler Westpfahl said...

Watching them make the guardians was super cool! It'd be fun working as a group like that on a giant woodcut. Is there a different way to apply pressure to a big block like that?

Katheryn Horne said...

Very cool!