The epic tale of the University of Wisconsin LaCrosse Printmaking Program. The Printmaking program is directed by Joel Elgin and features the odd collection of the many PrintFools who enroll, print and exist from semester to semester in the Shop of Tears.

Sunday, March 06, 2016

Mauricio!!


It's Mauricio Week PrintFools!


Mauricio was my Prof. This week he will teach you, so go to the links below:

http://www.lasanskyart.com/ 

That link up there will take you to his website now run by his sons, Phillip and Tomas.


Now go to the link below and watch the video. You all need it and the Babies really need it for this week

Inside the Image
 
 Leave some words...

10 comments:

Keagan Van Eperen said...

I thought it was neat that his family were printers, it was in his blood it seems and came naturally. He made a lot of leaps and bounds at a young age and seemed to have established himself as an artist in a corrupt environment. He capitalized on the corruption around him and this influenced his works immensely.
It was fascinating that he put in so much effort to reshape the art/printing department at Iowa, he truly reintroduced printing to the education systems.

MadDog PrintFool said...

It must have been such an honor to be taught under Mauricio. I think it's great that his sons took over the website and are still running it. Great and inspirational work.

KarliN said...

It's awesome how he was so committed and dedicated to help make the printmaking world grow. Classes went from having 6 people to having over hundreds of people interested! He truly impacted the printmaking world in a great way.

stefaniestriker said...

I love how much Mauricio advocated for his students and individual artists alike to first discover themselves before creating art-advising them to know what they do and do not what, how they react, and what their beliefs are. This advisement shows true in his work, especially the reaction and captured emotion in his Nazi Drawings.
An other admirable trait I found to be enlightening was his different pieces of works' "states." I admire how much he develops upon each piece after each print, altering the work and growing it to optimize its overall artistic impact.

Amanda Kamps said...

Mauricio's work is really amazing and inspirational. I think its awesome his cite is still up and running. I also thought the Nazi drawings were interesting and its amazing how much thought and feeling he put into them.

Montana Smith said...

Lasansky had a very distinct style, the faces in his early works are almost alien. The line in his pieces is beautiful- from the ones used for illumination in Maternidad to the fractured look of Time and Space. The lithograph Cadaver is a really inspiring in its use of shading to create space in concert with line. His later works have such a different look than the early ones. The color in particular is a stand out feature. Being that I don't have a strong understanding of Intaglio, I feel like I don't have a decent understanding of how much work was put into those prints, but they're very neatly put together for the number of plates involved (The Clown had 22 plates? That's a lot of plates. Like... a lot. So much effort. Especially since it's a CLOWN.)

kasey pesch said...

In particular I find it so interesting and wonderful that Mauricio dedicated his time to "The Nazi Drawings." This collection of work really spread light on the Nazi brutality and I'm glad someone during the time period was able to see this brutality and find it so horrifying.

Rachael Willcox said...

This image looks "normal" when looked at, but I wonder why it was chosen to have the neck bee the way that it is in this print. It almost looks as if he is wearing a neck brace, but then you look and see that it is simply his shirt. Also, when looking at his shirt, you see that it would be some sort of button up, yet it does not have the collar to represent it that way. It makes me wonder the reasoning behind representing the neck in this way.

Mitchell Doerr said...

I knew Joel was a wonder of the world in and of himself; a Professor Keating-like man. Nevertheless, I did not know he was apart of one of the scores of students under Lasansky, "who in turn are teaching scores of future generations in the U.S." Boy, do I feel blessed to be apart of the same article. But as Lasansky showed Joel, Joel moves on to show us as the "Son of the Father of 20th Century American Printmaking." The way they both describe art portrayal is second to none. Being a self-proclaimed philosopher myself, I love the way Lasansky makes us think about art, just as Joel continues to challenge us.

to teach scores of students, who in turn are teaching scores of future generations in the United States and abroad. For all these reasons, Mauricio Lasansky is considered to be one of the "Fathers of 20th Century American Printmaking."

Allison Johnson said...

This man is genius, no wonder why he wanted the brilliant Joel Elgin to be one of his pupils. We are in blessed with the presence of an omniscient printmaking God!