The epic tale of the University of Wisconsin LaCrosse Printmaking Program. The Printmaking program is directed by Joel Elgin and features the odd collection of the many PrintFools who enroll, print and exist from semester to semester in the Shop of Tears.

Sunday, February 21, 2016

Snack and Movie Week


PrintFools!! Grab your snacks:




Wayne Thiebaud

Cake Window,

1965

Etching; from Delights, a book of seventeen etchings





Wayne Thiebaud

Double Deckers,

1965

Drypoint; from Delights, a book of seventeen etchings

Image Size:4x5


For more snacks: 
Wayne Thiebaud





Its Movie Week!!!!



Rated G for Babies
 
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Rated PG for Ado's and sort of Big Kids



Better leave words, trouble is on the way because you arent...



15 comments:

Montana Smith said...

The process of making the stones was really interesting. It's impressive how close they could get the shape with just the hammer before they brought in the finer detail tools. The first sanding of the large block surprised me. I thought they were going to make a HUGE litho print! The amount of waste stone generated was also surprising, though it probably made it in landscaping since it wasn't destined for art.

Nhouchee Yang said...

Wayne Thiebaud's work always makes me want sweets. Also that video of the litholand is awesome. I like how much information it has provided. I wonder if our limestones have plattenkalk in them??

Avery Dietzen said...

It's cool how exact that little hammer can make the limestone. It's also so cool to see how huge the stones are to start out with and how much they chip away to get them down to size. That buffer is also pretty neat. Also, Wayne Thiebaud's prints are really interesting. I like how simplistic they are.

Chris Schoen said...

Ain't gonna lie, my favorite part of the whole video was watching them smack a giant rock with sledge hammers, just seems so enjoyable to do.

Madline Thorn said...

I love Wayne Thiebaud's art, I've seen his paintings before but I didn't know he also made prints. The video was really cool, I felt like the limestone was having a little spa day. They get cleaned up, buffed, and chip away at the stone to make it the perfect little rectangle. Also that guy's mustache at 14:25 was worth the wait.

Keagan Van Eperen said...

I thought the whole process of "harvesting" the lime stone was extremely interesting and complex, watching all of the steps and how many different people it took just to get a simple slab of rock made me appreciate the final product (actual art piece) even more!

KarliN said...

I appreciate Thiebaud's prints of food because I love food! But I also was really intrigued by the video of how the limestone blocks were made. It makes one appreciate the stone more because of all of the hard work put into just even making one.

Allison Johnson said...

I am inspired to make a book of snicksnack delights-- plot twist though, mine will be in yummy colors! In all actuality, I will make this book of my delicious life. I am currently at work so I cannot watch the movie yet, but I will as soon as I get home.

stefaniestriker said...

I love the how easily recognizable the desserts are in Thiebaud's prints. The stark black and white make the more abstract than exact replica desserts stand out, in an old-fashioned diner kind of way. In Tulip Sundae the black lines are so well placed, leaving just enough for the imagination. As for the limestone video, it is amazing how mother nature can create such perfect objects (with a little help from mankind). I'll be sure to bring my tools for mallet Monday.

Andrea Anderson said...

I'm always envious of silky drypoints like Double Decker. I've always found the process of drypoint to be frustrating; perhaps I never gave it a proper chance. Also WHY has blogger made it even harder to post? I had to solve like 7 puzzles to confirm I'm a human.

Amanda Kamps said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Amanda Kamps said...

I love desserts so I loved Thiebaud's prints. Both the videos were really interesting. I especially liked how the stone blocks were made. It looked like it was a lot of work to get the large chucks and then chip, sand, and polish to make it square and ready for use.

Emily Sander said...

The quarry video is fascinating to me! I have a new-found appreciation for the preciousness of my own stone.

Rachael Willcox said...

looking at the first picture of the cakes it is so simple, but then I look at the background and see the time it took to draw each of the lines to create the shadows. Knowing that we can create the shadows on copper by using acid, it almost makes you lose the patience you would need to create those lines without the acid.

Mitchell Doerr said...

I have never, and more than likely will never cut limestone. However, it doesn't matter what one uses for art, we tend to take what is given to us for granted. This includes the limestones that are cut in the quarry. Amazing amount of labor put in.