The epic tale of the University of Wisconsin LaCrosse Printmaking Program. The Printmaking program is directed by Joel Elgin and features the odd collection of the many PrintFools who enroll, print and exist from semester to semester in the Shop of Tears.

Sunday, September 25, 2011

A Repost witha Moral Tale and Some Movies


 Never been a fan of your stinking Oktoberfest...it reduces you to the following sad states depicted by Max Beckmann:


Max Beckmann

Die Gähnenden (The Yawners), 1918
Plate 7 from Gesichter (Faces)
Drypoint, 30.5 x 25.5 (45.0 x 37.0)





Max Beckmann
Irrenhaus (Madhouse), 1918
Plate 16 from Gesichter (Faces)
Drypoint, 26.0 x 30.5 (37.0 x 37.0)


So spend your week working in the Shop of Love, and watching the movies below... and if you are not convinced yet - read below:


the cool  little movies:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMMO5BGWNdw&feature=channel_video_title   


 
See you safe and sound and sober Monday and Tuesday and Wed and Thursday. BPJ

19 comments:

Marissa said...

How did gin make women sterile? I love Max Beckmann’s use of drypoint, beautiful fuzzy line quality. And cross-hatching to get darks is so much more fun than messing with aquatint. I never looked much at his woodcuts before, but give me more ideas to experiment with.Good videos for my dad to learn from :)

Sassalyn said...

I can't believe they gave gin to babies.I suppose this proves that some members of our species should not be actively contributing to society.:-) Nonetheless, a pretty amusing story. I saw a few images like Becmann's working at the coop over the weekend. The videos were alright, I wish he would have shown a photo of his finished reduction print because I didn't really see where he was getting the 3 colors. It was still pretty cool. Its interesting that he prints on fabric.

No Mas said...

The Musical Score in the video "Printing Relief Blocks by Hand" was very choice.

Christina said...

I can't believe that they would give gin to babies either, or that people would sell their kids. I liked the second video on woodcuts; it was good for people who might not know a lot about them. Max Beckmann's prints are really great because they are so full of emotion and pull you in with their story. I also must say that Germans are awesome printmakers :)

Rachel Albrecht said...

Can't wait to get back in the shop. Miss all my brothers and sisters.
Heard the gin story before, but still an interesting story. Gin and babies.. must be like stupid people these days giving babies cough syrup. What a sick world.
I liked the videos, it was neat to see almost the whole process of both techniques.

Jules said...

Well, those youtube videos were pretty neat. Kinda fun and informative. I'm excited to someday work with color...but I'm not ready yet. I'm a Ferrel baby, so I'm not mature enough to print in color. Oh, and I also hate gin, it smells like Pine needles. Yuck. Babies and gin don't mix. :)

Clarice said...

love the videos. I thought the printing on fabric was really interesting. and yeah gin is pine needles I wont touch the stuff

Nate said...

gin tastes like pine needles and therefore christmas...yum :) Regardless I love the dimensionality of the last print, and the way that depth of field is dealt with using value...pro. That print looks frighteningly like oktoberfest as well.

megan said...

This week's post made me smile. Ohhh Oktoberfest. Great connection. I loved the texture Beckmann was able to achieve in those prints along with the intense value. And the videos were pretty cool. Basic, but you can always pick up on a few new things. I also liked his idea of printing on fabric. I'd love to try that. At some point in my life. :)

Katie said...

I love the textures achieved in Beckman's works and babies should not be exposed to alcohol. I wish we could print on fabric/ I want to screen print... it's been years since I have. Excited to start working on multi-plate printing as well!

Jenna Phish said...

"On the last night, as the last gallons of gin were sold off cheaply by the retailers who could not afford the duty, more alcohol was drunk than ever before or since." hahaha definitely reminds me of oktoberfest! loved his print and the detail.

P.S. great music choices in the videos!

Keriann said...

Beckmann's prints are great. I'm glad that I don't live close enough to Oktoberfest, so I did not have to see situations like the ones he creates in his art.

Those movies.... are way cool. I think that we should make our own movies like this and spread them around the internet to spread out print love.

Dani W said...

Guess Gin isnt all that it's cracked up to be. The uses that it was originally for were pretty crazy. But honestly, gin is pretty nasty. The woodcut videos were alright, but i still wish i knew more about how to cut the wood in a more detailed way as opposed to how to print.

LiARS said...

i like gin, i give it to all my children. the multi...board? woodcut is now on my list of things to do. i like the idea of just being able to add layers and layers. the images also reminded me of everyone but me. i am responsible.

Molly said...

Love the detail in these prints, so much to look at! I agree with Sassalyn that I wish he would have shown the finished reduction print, which is something I really want to try.
I have never really liked gin, now I probably never will!

Elizabeth Rose Bowman said...

Ha! Well I know plenty of people today will give a rum soaked nookie to a baby to relieve pain when it's teething or unable to sleep with a cold, etc. Maybe just me?
I like his compositions a great deal, they especially go to create an environment despite their flat quality. The madhouse- spilling out to the edges of the piece, pulsing expanding characters/shapes.

and obvs if it's been snowing it's cuz someone drank gin the night before.

Sikorski said...

dope,sick and triumphant.

KirkyB said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
KirkyB said...

Sorry, I was still hung over from Oktoberfest.

Max Beckmann is always interesting to look at. If I'm not mistaken he was producing working through the expressionist movement but preferred not to associate with it, which gave his work an interesting edge. I like the way he depicts the figure with a really gestural line quality.