The epic tale of the University of Wisconsin LaCrosse Printmaking Program. The Printmaking program is directed by Joel Elgin and features the odd collection of the many PrintFools who enroll, print and exist from semester to semester in the Shop of Tears.

Sunday, October 10, 2010

De Chirico and Baskin


Hey Printfools... A week of more dreams, more intaglio, more litho and classical story time.

 
Giorgio De Chirico
(click the title post for more)


 
Dualité, les muses inquiétantes 
intaglio 1975

 
Solitudine della gente di Circo - The Solitude of Circus People
Lithograph

 

Zebra e Cavallo
Lithograph 1969

  

And now... we revisit Leonard Baskin. 

Etchings from Euripides' play about Hippolitos and his father Theseus and step-mother Phaedra, queen of the Amazon.
(for more)



Phaedra Hanged
Etching 1969

Artemis
Etching 1969
 


26 comments:

Nate S said...

Certainly illustrates the diversity of printmaking and what you can do with it. I really like how in pieces like Combattimento di gladiatori form and dimension are developed completely with tone and value while pieces like Cavallo in libertà showcase a use of emotive line. The piece Trofeo combines both of these and adds some color highlights. Definitely gives me some insight into effective techniques and how they read differently, and can reflect subject matter.

Liv Radke said...

I totally agree with Nate. This week shows what a wide range you can achieve in different types of printmaking. De Chirico has such an interesting style and is able to portray very different feelings within his images. His Cavallo pieces are beautiful. I love the way he uses line to define muscle tone in his animals and his subtile use of color is extremely effective in highlighting his figures without being distracting, a great example for all of our adolescents exploring color this semester!

Cappuccino said...

ALWAYS been a big de Chirico fan but I never even knew he made prints as well. I enjoy how he brings the classic surrealist atmosphere to his works, with the flat landscape and objects that act as symbols. He often uses Greek themed statues and pillars and architecture. Being a Greek, this is part of his life, seeing it around and its interesting how he takes these canons and "strict" feelings of perfection that the Greeks supported and transformed them into this dream like atmosphere making a contrast. Really awesome.

Keriann said...

I am in love with so many of baskin's pieces. I think that thistle and blue flower is my favorite. His work is done using using primarily line, which I love. He uses such a variety of line quality, which is one of the main focuses in the simple forms he creates. De Chirco's work is also really amazing. He definitely has a different style than Baskin. It's interesting seeing the two together. One really detailed and the other down to very simple.

Sarahhigley said...

Baskin's delicate line quality reminded me of our very own K Rad and some of her small etchings of figures. The contrast between Baskin's lithos and etchings shows how different the two types of printmaking really are. I know very little about lithography but these prints by both Baskin and De Chirico made me want to learn how color lithos work. Like Keri Berry (Leg) I also like the nature prints due to their delicate lines.

Britt Vogt said...

I was struck by the chiaroscuro in Baskin's portraits, which really adds a dynamic element, much like the selective color in de chirico's lithos is used to create emphasis. "Solitude" by de Chirico really stood out to me because it is such a straight forward image and so brilliantly illustrates that emotion.

VLAO said...

Looking at De Chirico's prints I am reminded of what we have been doing in class, the dream concept. You have all these awkward subject put into a whole print. The weirdness of the subject and it's purpose can only be created in a dream but I think de Chirico captured it perfectly.

Allison Bauer said...

Agreeing with the others, this week isoing to sow all of the possibilities that printing has to offer--lots of exploitation, love it.

I'm in love with Baskin's line quality throughout his work. Beautiful, light and delicate.

Marissa said...

I like the subtle colors in "Dualite..." and I enjoy that the figures' heads resemble lightbulbs...or hot air balloons for some reason.
Baskin's lines are definitely the most interesting part of his work, how they create depth, contrast, and shape. The way he exaggerates parts of the figures bodies makes them unique, like in "Venus".

Zach Morin said...

Baskin's Native American lithos are BADASS!!!! I love the types of line and how contrasty the images are. Specifically how the edges and details are the fine painterly type but then the hair and shadows are just crammed with black. I think White Horse would have to be my favorite but I love the whole series.

stormy_sky08 said...

One thing I noticed most about these two artists is that they both use color very effectively, but in very different ways. De Chirico uses pops of color his zebra piece while Baskin does flowers almost all in one color. Both make this baby excited to try color some day!

Molly said...

These prints most definitely show how different and diverse printmaking is. I, for one, never knew the extent to which different printmaking methods differ. De Chirico's prints were really interesting, especially because of how similar they are to the prints we are making. They do seem very 'dream-like' and it just goes to show how weird and crazy can be captured in a piece of artwork.

My favorite pieces this week are definitely Baskin's Native American pieces. I couldn't take my eye away from them. They are very intriguing and I can feel the emotion right away when looking at them. The lines used in Baskin's work are impressive and create such contrast and emotion. I am really impressed with these prints this week!

Joanne said...

i agree with higley, baskin's line quality really reminds me of some of the etchings k rad did.

my favorite favorite favorite print by him is "iris for lisa" he gets such a range of value in the petals and makes them flow and look very delicate. its hard to make a line etch have those qualities

i also am inspired by both baskin's and de chirico's use of color. they both use it very subtly, but it really emphasizes the work nicely.

Max Hautala said...

I feel that Giorgio De Chirico's use of the images of horses to be shocking and raw. I enjoy he captures them in an eerie motion.

Tristan D. said...

I think I'm in amazement at De Chirico's use of depth in these prints. It really helps the main image to pop. If only I could get a better sense of depth in my prints...

K_Rad09 said...

Kristine

Well they prints definetly shows how diverse you can get with techniques and styles. I really enjoy Chirico's work. I like looking at the details; line quality, modeling that he achieves and always very subtly. I especially like his work when he uses the subtle use in color. Cavallo on the other hand isn't quite my style but I think he has very lyrical line and his work certianly has a unique enery.

Marikoko said...

De Chirico's works look like they're done by pencil, and Baskin's works look like they're done by pen. But it is not!(Of course!) If it was before taking the class I would have said, "why did't they just draw." But, now I started to know the yummy part of printmaking and kind of understand why. I can also feel the difference between printmaking and drawing or painting.The world that printmaking creates is so mysterious! Maybe it's because it contains certain unpredictable power of nature, although we might be able to control it if we want to. I just don't know how to yet, and I think figuring that out is one of the interesting parts of the printmaking. It could be very addicting.

Master Sass said...

Crazy difference in line quality. Very interesting prints, I'm curious about color litho, Joel.

Mark K said...

de Chirico has some awesome line quality and cross hatching in his prints, especially "Combattimento di gladiatori." He has an unreal knack for utilizing that fuzzy quality you get with doing drypoint to show shading in the figures. I'm with Zach for Leonard Baskin. His litho series on Native American individuals from different tribes is sick. The woodcut self portraits were incredible. His use of all the tiny lines in the beard in his portrait of himself when he was 56 looks so realistic. Also, real sweet that he was a painter, sculptor, printmaker, and writer while doing lots of different subject matter.

BeardedBabyBen said...

I like Chiricos style. The depth in his prints is impressive. I'd like to start creating things like that. His works have such depth in detail in them. The color is old and faded it seems. Would have liked to see them with some brighter colors but maybe that was just what he was going for.

For the most part I wasn't a big fan of Baskin. the Indians and the Ram's head were pretty gangsta tho

Cruel Ass said...

I feel like there is sooooo much for me to grasp still in this crazy world of print making. I love it, it's a challenge, but I enjoy it all. I can't help but be inspired by not only artists worthy enough to appear in this blog but also by fellow print makers. De Chirico's prints were brilliant. I pretty much enjoyed every aspect he had in his prints. His values, his content, his use of color. Impressed, simply impressed!

Kirky B said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWOYXFU5boQ&feature=player_embedded

Andrew Meyer said...

de Chirico's style is very appealing to me. each of the prints reminds me of how I dream. I like the look of the 'blind contour' etchings... i find that such a simple exercise can bring out the unconscious emotion behind the mindset of the artist.

Michelle said...

Still can't decide if the Artemis print is a girl or a boy. Now that I know the title, Artemis is a kinda of masculine name. It is throwing me off.
The litho prints are very impressive. I didn't know you could use color with lithos. It definitely makes me curious.

Rachel said...

I liked Baskin's prints of flowers the best. I can relate more of my work to his flowers.

Old Greg said...

I love these works, they show the type of depth that i'd like to achieve in my own prints that im not getting right now...sadness :(