The epic tale of the University of Wisconsin LaCrosse Printmaking Program. The Printmaking program is directed by Joel Elgin and features the odd collection of the many PrintFools who enroll, print and exist from semester to semester in the Shop of Tears.

Friday, October 15, 2010

Bezdikian ASSADOUR


 Hey PrintFools:
Feast on these etchings and click the title post for even more. 

Jeux
Etching
imagesize : 11x15 in (29x39 cm


 Quatre masques
Etching
image size : 21x10 in (53x26 cm)

Wasnt our own Lisa brilliant at the Art Function Thursday? 
Oh, and if you havent had a chance to check out the video KirkyB posted for last week please do - I sort of hate him for doing it, and its a known fact that I typically think he is swell for a teapartier.

24 comments:

Keriann said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Keriann said...

Assadour's prints are very interesting. He's definitely an aquatint master! He has such a great variety in values on his prints! I think what I like most are the ones where he ever so slightly incorporates color. It's an interesting approach to using color, I think it's something I'd like to try in the future. I like Crépuscule the best.


Kirk~ you found that video on inkteraction! I was going to post it for Halloween, but you beat me to it! It's definitely a new way of thinking about blood while in the shop... Not sure if I'd really like printing that way though! for everyone who hasn't seen it you should check the video out here is the link again..... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWOYXFU5boQ&feature=player_embedded

Lisa Ulik said...

blogtastic!

kirk...brilliant youtube vid posting. loved it.

Love Assadour's work as well. There's a great dynamic between control of the media and design elements and that which is out of control (content within the subconscious).

It was so great seeing so many brilliant and beautiful printmaker faces at Thursday's colloquium!

K_Rad09 said...

Kristine

I find it hard to look away from Assadour's prints. They are very unique in the way of geometric forms and I feel that because of that the composition is really important and he does is wonderfuly. He has such contrast in his pieces and the way he uses the aquatint to achieve it is phenominal. My favorite has to be Phantasmes where he incorporates subtle color variation and variation between the profiles and figures.

Rachel said...

I too really enjoy the values that Assadour achieved.
As for Kirk's video.. it was sweet but at the same time made me really lightheaded.. I'm not so good with blood and needles..

BeardedBabyBen said...

Sweet video. disgusting. but thats pretty cool. I really liked how Assadour used the lines and geometric shapes in his images. I really liked "Le voie lactée". His subtle use of color and the placement of all the random objects in the background made this piece really interesting. I was really trying to figure out why he titled it "the milky way" but I couldn't figure it out. I still liked it though.

VLAO said...

These are nice prints. Not my taste but I really appreciate the techiques and composition. I notice there are some minute details or black dots on the work itself. Whether it is intentional or accidently I think it works well.

Max Hautala said...

I would like to be able to achieve the extensive values that Assadour produces in his work. Wayne Coyne never fails to amaze.

Britt Vogt said...

wowzer, instense blacks in these prints! The sharp edges of the dark areas are really interesting to me, and how in the faces and masks just a little shading can give so much volume and shape. Also really impressed by the number prints in each addition, I printed my first addition this weekend and was burnt out after 11, and some of these are 70+ prints....

Molly said...

I couldn't stop looking at these prints - seriously cool stuff! His work incorporates such a range of values, that I agree with Max in wanting to achieve that myself. My favorite is "Quatre Masques". It has so much going on, which was neat. I stared at that print for about 10 minutes and I still want to look at it some more.

As for the video...I couldn't watch all of it because it was making my stomach hurt. It definitely was interesting, that's for sure!

Joanne said...

haha i found that video on inkteraction too! but i got squeemish while watching it for the first time, me and blood dont do so well together. still kind of antsy after watching it for a second time.

as for Assadour's prints, i love his use of line and perspective. i especially enjoy the way he combines organic and geometric shapes. it gives each print such a mathematical appearance.

Cruel Ass said...

Mmm... Ice cream and blood prints?? LOL Nice video!

Nate S said...

haha awesome video. totally thought about how someone could incorporate blood last semester. but didn't want to be too creepy nor would i know how to get my hands on some blood ;) Assodour's prints are pretty sick. Definitely get your eye to move and stop to focus on desired focal points. Love to value range. I've got some aquatint practice to do.

stormy_sky08 said...

I love the bold blacks and abstract aspects of Assoudour's work. I didn't get a chance to watch the video yet but people's comments have certainly made me curious. By the way, I love to see that Baby Cruel Ass is finally embracing who she truly is.

Old Greg said...

I really love how bold and dark these prints are! They show depth, and are very geometric and awesome to look at. So stoked to try to get this same variation in value with my own prints!

Tristan D. said...

Wow, I never thought I would see so much depth, clean lines and gradients with metal etching! These etchings are just great! Did anyone notice that there are circles or spheres in every etching somewhere?

I do like the idea of using blood as pigment. I wouldn't want to use my own blood, but the idea definitely pushes the use of pigmentation. I suppose it's no different than using blood to make the pigment for red barns in the 'old days'.

AnnCreates87 said...

The etches are amazing! The first one, doesn't look like a print to me, just the way that it's composed. I really enjoy the geometric shapes within the prints. There are so many valus, and I can't imagine, how many times they were put in the acid or scrapped to get the range achieved. Off to go wath Kirky's video...

Marikoko said...

How cool! I love Assadour's prints...not only the details and the style but also the world that these prints contain. It looks dark, but for me his world looks like a children's world depicted by adult. Full of joy and fun.

And for the video...using own blood for the ink? Yea, come to think we can use anything for the ink as long as it allows to print...and blood is a really good choice. BUT personally I prefer red ink...

Kirky B said...

Hahaha I'm glad you all got a kick out of that video. I did find it on inkteraction, which by the way all you big kids and babies should check out if you havnt yet. Its a really awesome way to get more involved in the printmaking culture.

Assadour's prints are really different! The geometric shapes that compose the imagery is unlike a lot of prints we've seen this semester. Even when there is a figure in the composition it is made up of a lot less organic shapes. I'm really interested in the way that the dashed lines work with the image creating implied lines that carry through the piece.

I'm curious too, how he creates that smokey quality in his etch, specifically in Jeux and L'ovale et la pyramide.

Liv Radke said...

This set of prints is one of my all time favorites. I am so intrigued by the range of values and textures. Assadour's print Crépuscule is awesome and my eyes keep getting pulled to it. A perfect use of color to draw the eye the whole length of the arch and then then just a few subtle color blocks on the top, but all the pattern and design within the aquatint is beyond amazing.

I agree with most of you about not being a fan of blood, but thanks Kirky for sharing with us!

Mark K said...

Assadour has an incredible amount of control with his line etches and aquatints. Doing all the geometric shapes, like everyone said, is really impressive and really makes me dig the prints. All the small geometric forms and objects in the one section of "Poubelle pour souvenirs" really blows my mind.

Michelle said...

Bezdikian Assadour's prints are impressive. The range of value is really nice. Lisa did so well at the Colloquium, all of the artists did a great job presenting and showing off their works. I was very surprised with how much I enjoyed it.

Andrew Meyer said...

Assadours prints have such a profound eery feeling. The aquatint is incredible, printmakers like this always seem to amaze me everytime. To have he skill and the patients to tackle sometime this relative and detailed is astounding. These remind me of something Tim burden would think up for a movie.

Marissa said...

The four masks prints are the most interesting to me; the way he split up the faces and replacing the missing parts of the faces with shapes and lines.The contrasts Assadour creates are beautiful.