The epic tale of the University of Wisconsin LaCrosse Printmaking Program. The Printmaking program is directed by Joel Elgin and features the odd collection of the many PrintFools who enroll, print and exist from semester to semester in the Shop of Tears.

Friday, September 10, 2010

Gouge.... at the Hammer

Time for a field trip Print Hipsters and TeaPartiers...



click the Post title first then,

click the following:
http://hammer.ucla.edu/exhibitions/detail/exhibition_id/141 

See youall Monday (or Tuesday). Prepare for some low level pain.
BPJ



34 comments:

Rachel said...

I really enjoyed seeing the prints that showed the wood grain. I also took a look at some of Albrecht Dürer's work and liked his woodcut titled Samson Rending the Lion.

Alyssa said...

This startled me... Getting a little anxious! I can't wait to start getting into print making.

Lisa Ulik said...

Impressive exhibition!

the range of subject matter and content from the most ancient to the most present... all utilizing gouging techniques... well it's incredible to say the least.

print up a storm! (hi babies)

K_Rad09 said...

-Kristine-

Wow. I have to say that I was literally amazed at the work especially Carmelo Iglesias'
La Seudorepublica y la Revolucion. I really like how full the space is, the rather intimidating size, the message of the works, and also how many of them integrated the natural wood grain to the peices. I can't wait to get started!

Britt Vogt said...

I am so glad that BPJ has added woodcut to our printmaking line-up. Get it...Line?

While in Italy, one of the Hostels that I stayed at in Rome had a few woodcuts up on the walls. I think woodcuts are so impressive because all you have to work with is line, no shading, no intermediate grays just black and white (well, almost depending on what ink you print with and the paper)

Anyway this summer I experimented with making linocuts, and I found it to be really easy to cut into the lino which resulted in smooth controlled lines. You can work a linocut with a lot of precision, as long as you are patient. I was happy to see a linocut in the exhibit link on the blog (the sharecropper)

So for a while I have been debating the difference between doing linocuts and woodcuts. Why work with wood if lino is so much easier to cut through? Is lino a lesser medium of poorer quality? I have at least one answer: linocuts have no wood grain. I LOVE the texture created in Anselm Kiefer's
Grane it adds such depth and visual interest to the print.

Bring on the wood.

Molly said...

I loved looking at this exhibition! It is intimidating to say the least to see all of this impressive art, but I am really anxious to start learning everything!

It was interesting to see the prints progress through time and I also love the look of the natural grain showing through in the artwork. I am excited to start!!!

Liv Radke said...

So I will be honest I am a little nervous to be doing woodcut. I did some linoleum prints when I was in highschool, and I found them to be a challenge. Woodcuts are something new and different but I am excited for this new type of printing. I love how simple a woodcut can be. Georg Baselitz's print "The Eagle" had such simple and delicate lines, the print really leaves room for interpretation by the viewer.

I am glad we have all the new bandaids because I vividly remember fellow classmates in highschool cutting themselves frequently when doing woodcuts. Hopefully we wont need them :)

AnnCreates87 said...

The woodcut exhibit was great. I really enjoyed "Sharcropper", and "Grane". The linews were beautiful and powerful.

It's a little intimidating to look at these since I've never done something like this. I just hope I can produce a good image.

Betsy V said...

I found the exhibit and essay very interesting— reminded me I've long admired the woodcuts by the German Expressionists for their raw, bold, graphic energy.

And in my own graphic design work over the years, I've often used copies of old (copyright-free) woodcuts for spot illustrations in publications, never stopping to think about their origins in the (bloody) hands of some poor gouger…

So now I'm psyched about woodcuts!

Keriann said...

I worked with woodcut a bit this summer, but I'm really excited to actually learn stuff about it. I think that after seeing the exhibit and looking at the details of the prints I like the simplicity of line that is used in woodcuts, like in Furrows IV. I do also like the texture/detail in woodcuts as well as seen in Grane.

On a side note...A few of us are planning to do a print exchange through inkteraction again coming up soon in this semester. If anyone is interested talk to me by Tuesday because that is when the RSVP is due by.

Marissa said...
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Marissa said...

I think I've probably seen woodcut before and not realized it.

I am especially interested in the prints that show the wood grain; they remind me of my dad (he likes to work with wood...makes desks, chests, vases, plays around with marquetry). I'm excited :)

Old Greg said...

Working with wood should be really cool. IT looks like you can get some really cool texturing and stuff like that, and that's got me stoked!

Tristan D. said...

Wow, I never knew woodblock printing was so popular and old! I get the feeling that my intro to printmaking is just the start to a new avenue of my work. I ventured into pen and ink drawing this summer and wood block printing looks just like an extension of that. Sweet!

Marikoko said...

Wow, some works are very detailed and amazing. But, although it looks very simple, I really like Felix Vallotton's "Three Bathers"!! Also, I am getting excited to learn about woodcut, as many favorite Japanese artists of mine do woodcut.

Nate said...

Pretty impressive to see how people took on the medium. Definitely made me realize its potential. A little better than the haggered woodcuts i bled all over to make this summer. Should be interesting to do it in class though. Hope to figure out how to incorporate woodgrain into a piece. I think that's sweet but i never got it over the summer.

Michelle said...

I am really nervous to work with the wood blocks. It must have something to do with the fact that you can't really make mistakes.
The exhibit was really sweet. I didn't know that wood block was so universal. It sounded like a lot of countries contributed to the exhibit.

No Max Hau said...

After being in class today, and being shown a beginning part of a process of printmaking, I feel as if

Allison Bauer said...

This should be a pretty exciting semester. I cant wait to see how this wood cut thing turns out. should be interesting!

Joanne said...

i'm stoked to start wood cuts especially after looking at some of these! i've got ideas brewing...ready go!

Dani said...

completly intimidated... no biggie

benalberti said...
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benalberti said...

I am excited to get started on this. Not sure how good I'll be at carving into wood. I am anxious to see what I can make tho.

Kirky B said...

I'm interested in how the artists of the late 19th century who embraced woodcut would " include the nature of the medium" in their prints and take advantage of the wood surface that they were working with. I'll be keeping this in mind when chipping away.

Edvard Munch is one of my favorites when it come to woodcut. Not a lot of people know it but he was a printmaker, mostly with litho and woodcut. He experimented a lot with the wood and produced some awesome results.

http://www.britishmuseum.org/images/ps110992_l.jpg

Jim Dunn said...

This makes me excited to get started. I was not sure how much I was going to like wood printing but this showed me what can be done with it.

Zach Morin said...

The woman in that video is such a hipster...

Regardless, I love how much variation in line can be achieved through gouging and the various ways the cultures on displayed utilized to their need.

At the same time, regardless of the variation, everything has this incredibly graphic and bold line that that simply draws the viewer in.

Even the hindu and buddhist images where the line was intended to be quite thin, is still somehow rather bold

Sarahhigley said...

I am stunned and amazed by the diversity of styles that are possible with woodcuts. Looking though the prints in that one particular show, I saw so many different kinds of lines...some were clean and precise and others so rough and expressive. I can't wait to start figuring out what we cna do with our little planks.

Bethany said...

Wood makes everything amazing.
Wood type vs. Lead type
Wood cut vs. lino cut
Wood=Winner.

So happy we are gonna start doing wood cuts and change this up a bit this semester.

Collazo America Latina, Unete! wood cut is so detailed and intense. I really would love to see this print in person. Even seeing it in HD I doubt the beauty of the wood grain would be quite the same. The linocut, Sharecropper by Catlett almost looks like a scratch board. Love the linear details used to make chiaroscuro.

the Sheriff said...

So for all the print-hipsters and teapartiers...the acid is suuuuuuuupppppeeeeerrr strong! Really thin varnish layers or cover ups and think lightly applied aquatint is coming off of not just my plates, but other hipsters and teapartiers plates. just to forewarn you guys!


I did get a chance to check out these INSANE wood cuts... i must admit, i know very little about the world of wood cutting... I'm a bit intimidated. (by the unknown, not the pain of course!)

See you all on Tuesday when myself and deputy brass-ass return from our California adventures!

Jessalyn said...

So excited for wood cuts this semester. It's a completely different way of thinking and creating an image. Great exhibit.

Mark K said...

Some quality ass woodcuts in that video. The huge traffic scene with all lateral lines at different widths to create the print was fucking incredible. Really shows you how much you can do with woodcut. I'm with Kirky B too, working with the grain of the wood to add to the print itself is real sick.

Carlamarie said...

its all about the wood baby. the diversity you can get with this medium is awesome,& the different qualities of the prints.
Baselitz's "Eagle" compared to "Sharecropper",both great prints, just completely different approach... I feel like the quality of mine is going to look like a messier more choppy offshoot of Baselit'z "Eagle".

skyler said...

I'm a little late on this because I had a lapse of brain cell usage but after working on some woodcut, I can totally appreciate the work that goes into creating detail or any sort of controlled marks in wood really. Can't wait to see how my first woodcut print turns out!

ellen said...

i find the different ways of mark-making in woodcut really fascinating. instead of shading and gradiations of grey, the artist is forced to change the direction and shape of their mark. its very impressive that they lose no depth or detail under these constraints.