The epic tale of the University of Wisconsin LaCrosse Printmaking Program. The Printmaking program is directed by Joel Elgin and features the odd collection of the many PrintFools who enroll, print and exist from semester to semester in the Shop of Tears.

Friday, April 09, 2010

William Blake

Follow all the links PrintFools - learn secrets. Be ready this week for the Root Note exhibit and for Beth's exhibit (more on this in class)

Nebuchadnezzar, 1795


Blake and LosVersion:


Blake Links to follow (check the title post as well)

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8451731.stm


http://18thcenturyart.suite101.com/article.cfm/artist_and_engraver_william_blake


25 comments:

Kaitlynn said...

Willaim Blake is a badass. It's pretty amazing to be the dude who invented relief printing. Also, I am really impressed and inspired by what he did with watercolor and stitching the prints together...sounds like a fantastic book to me. The Marriage of Heaven and Hell is my favorite one on the bbc site. He depicts muscles and bones in this really very soft way, yet the print is one of a sort of terror, by the looks of the faces in the folks.

I will also add that I have never been the first to comment before.

Boo-yah.

Maddy Grimmer said...

I think its amazing that William Blake's etchings were put up for sale by a man who bought them at a secondhand book sale. Wow, creating relief etching, quite an accomplishment! I can defiantly relate to his notorious habit of taking years to complete work due to he repeated corrections. But three years on one plate is inspiring. His etchings are almost unsettling to look at...i'm not sure what it is but they are still very intriguing.

Britt Vogt said...

Incredibly volumetric figures really dominate his plates. Nicely done. I also find it interesting how the people he chose to surround himself with influcenced his work- feminists, and the article refers that "his house was a renouned meeting place for intellectuals and rebels of the time"

One more thing that struck me was how the third article talked about that his most original works were achieved when he blended text and images in a highly personal way. Lesson to be learned there.

EllieRose said...

It's pretty much my favorite thing when the right people find themselves together and scheming ensues. Sounds like his shop was the place for that. I think I like him more for having read that he did make mistakes. More accessible.

Jessalyn said...

What a crazy cool dude. I love the fact that his idea for his new etching process came to him in a vision when his brother died. I believe that is proof that their may be some black magic or maybe white magic in intaglio too. His content is appealing, it draws you in. He puts so much emotion inside of them that they are hard to ignore.

BabyTiegs said...

I also find him to be even more relatable, and perhaps even more of a badass, because it was mentioned that he made mistakes and managed to triumph over them.
His art reminds me a lot of Goya's darker works like "Saturn". It's very compelling and yet unsettling to look at.

Jaime said...

What I love about his work is the great sense of emotion you get out of the figures. You look at their face and you feel the pain or saddness that each one is trying to provoke. The texture that he uses in his prints is also very impressing; the deepness of the line gives you an even more of an emotional respond.

Nate S said...

Sounds like a pretty solid dude. A little pretentious to try vigorously to cover up any mistakes you made, everyone makes them, it's kinda what makes art for me. None the less, real bad ass to create a new style of printing, and i suppose a little pretentiousness is allowed when you produce work like that.

Bethany said...

Badass.
The first print of Nebuchadnezza is kinda creepy, but none the less still badass. The second print reminds me of a very sexual painting that is on the wall of legends, just saying. He depicts the human form with raging muscles very idealistically. His prints are very much filled with movement.

Mallory_Heesch said...

!!! This really stood out to me !!!
"Blake’s most original artworks are prints in which he blends text and imagery in a highly personal way.

He recreated the medieval illuminated manuscripts in a way never done since. In his mind, he never separated the poetry from the art: text and design are completely integrated into what he called “illuminated printing.” He created what he called illuminated books by this process of illuminated printing".

It's really cool to see how he also used text combined with his imagery. It gives the artwork a richness with the integration of his poetry.

Very inspiring to learn about an amazing artist who also combines text and imagery. I feel somewhat vindicated and wish I had that knowledge as an arsenal against the comments (during the 399 review) that the use of text weakened my art.


William Blake is my hero.

Joanne said...

wow, hes a pretty badass dude. i really like how all of his prints seem to be overflowing with emotion. each one depicts something different which is fairly easily picked up on.

in other news, i'm excited for our show! i've already bought my frame and i'm ready to go :)

Clarice said...

I love his use of color, Its not a very sharp color but comes off soft. Also I really like his figures

Anonymous said...

I truly admire Blakes work, there are so very beautiful, creative, detailed, and exact. I find some relief knowing that he wasn't perfect and that he had made mistakes oh and that he took forever to complete a print. His work is something that I could look at all day, and would ponder and wish I could of seen someone like him working on a print as well his process of creating such a work of art.

Sarahhigley said...

So I'm still on the couch at home but I hope to be back in the shop by the end of the week. I had no idea that a poet I have always known was a printmaker! I looked into his illuminated printing a little more because it sounded fascinating. I love that he took his two passions, his writings and prints, and combined them. This is something that he couldn't have accomplished with another medium and it shows how you can manipulate any medium to make it work for you in unique ways. His images are so dark and beautiful. From what I read about his life in the articles, I think there is much more to learn from William Blake and his ideas about art and literature. I'd love to read a biography on him!

Keriann said...

Blakes prints are cool. I am in love with the textures within each one, and the colors that he gets as well. I kind of think some of the figures are creepy though! Overall he's awesome!

Mingo said...

Invented the lithograph process, relief etching,and illuminated printing...what a free thinker.

His etchings are interesting to look at, just with the way he created a soft feel to the muscles.

AnnCreates87 said...

whew, glad I finally got this to work today. The print of Nebuchadnezzar is pretty neat. I enjoy the colors and the lines are fantastic. I too find it a relief to know that he wasn't perfect. Just goes to show that practice is needed for even the best artist. I can't wait to go look up a little more on Blake.

Mark K said...

The fact that he pounded out the back of his plates to get rid of all the mistakes to cut again was pretty crazy. The fact that they were hand colored too, real sick.

Johnson said...

Blake's handling of the figure is pretty amazing. The musculature and movement of each figure is so interesting, they look as if they are bulging out of the 2-D realm. These prints are pretty sweet, and the fact that he invented relief printing is cool too

Kirky B said...

Its good to know that even a printmaking master like William Blake fucked up A LOT when he was perfecting his art.. because I fuck up a lot too.

sarah mc said...

i like what kirky said about fucking up...thats true if you didn't fuck up it wouldn't be as awesome to makes something you really love. william blakes prints are really cool...the facial expressions are mesmerizing. im really excited to see everyone's stuff at the rootnote!

Liv Radke said...

BabyTiegs said it well. I think it is awesome that Blake encountered mistakes and worked to bring them back to the way he wanted. In some ways it almost feels like he was recycling his plates and hammering them back to the way he wanted to reuse them. The fact that he kept working on them and created what he wanted spending so much time on them, shows that there is hope for all us perfectionists out there!

I am so excited to see our beautiful prints hanging at the RootNote! Work will feel more like home now!

Allison Bauer said...

I like most of William Blake's art work. I am very impressed by what that man can do with water color. There was an exhibit of his work at the Tate Liverpool that I had the privilege of seeing while I studied abroad. It was such a highlight to be able to see some of his work in person.

Michelle said...

William Blake's interpretation of the human body is definitely interesting. I like it though, in the sense of how muscular they are. It is the human body taken to the extreme. Overall though, his prints are really sweet and impressive. I like the colors a lot.

Marissa said...

I love the variety of colors used and textured look of the prints. The facial expressions and strange body poses are really interesting to me as well.
I never would have thought to combine printmaking and water color.