The epic tale of the University of Wisconsin LaCrosse Printmaking Program. The Printmaking program is directed by Joel Elgin and features the odd collection of the many PrintFools who enroll, print and exist from semester to semester in the Shop of Tears.

Friday, September 25, 2009

Bob Haozous not Selifan

Clear your sad heads Printfools!
if Octoberfest gets in the way of making prints then you are:

Selifan...

Marc ChagallSelifan (Sorlier 7, Hannover 45). 1923-27.

“...Chagall's etchings for Gogol's Dead Souls are among his earliest etchings. Selifan is a rather rascally figure who believes in self-indulgence and would rather party than work...”


So live in the shop and embrace content by studying this monoprint by my friend:


Bob Haozous


Bob Haozous, Santa Fe, NM

Round Eye, 2005, monotype, 24"x19"


Bob's prints are hard to find but I want you to click the title post and read about the content of his sculpture. Apply his words to your life in printmaking and be led by his inspiration rather than following the lead of drunken old men wearing goofy assed german clothes.

35 comments:

Jumpy said...

I enjoy the fact that he embraces the things that have made him, him. That his work reflects his history and the things that has impacted him in his life. His work has so much meaning and I definitely admire that. I enjoy the his work of sculpture that has an ancient and absract look to it. But as for the weekend I find the drunken people at octoberfest that dress up kind of funny.

Keriann said...

Every piece of work for him has a meaning behind it, and is something that is important to him. His culture plays a huge role in all of his works, and it was interesting to read what he had to say about that. He talks about the "restrictiveness about the Indian Market" at one point, and how it stifles creativity. It must be hard to want to put so much meaning and thought into a work of art, and then have it not sell or be looked at because it didn't fit the stereotype.

Sarahhigley said...

One thing that jumped out at me that this artist said was, "I do a lot of issues that hopefully slap you in the face, because they slap me in the face." The reason that this stood out to me was because I am currently trying to find a theme or issue to explore for the social justice/injustice problem that I have yet to begin. This artist deals with personal injustice in his own life and also on a large scale. He talked about situations where he faced stereotypes and discrimination. I thought it was fascinating when he wrote about representing so many generations. When I make my own work, I hardly ever consider myself as an artist who represents anybody but myself, but this made me think. Is my work representing women, college students, Christians, redheads? It gave me a lot to think about. Good one Joel.(By the way, almost all the ink came out of my sweater, so thanks for the trick!)

Allison Bauer said...

I like how there's more meaning in his work. that's it's not art for arts sake. Really interesting stuff.

Toni said...

The most interesting sounding of his that I read is "The Puppet Princess," using the nude female body as a representation of Mother Nature, and then showing it as something taken for granted, used, and manipulated. Really deep stuff there. I think his stuff is interesting because I don't think I see a whole lot of Indian sculpture, especially that which tries to depict the grim realities of the culture though the eyes of one inside. It's interesting how he said that some stuff he made wouldn't be bought, and upon changing it then people would buy it. Pretty crazy that he has to mask his reality in his art..

Maddy Grimmer said...

I think its really interesting how he feels like he has so many generations of Apache to represent, as he says an entire culture. It really makes oneself think if they are doing the same, and do we even consider the fact that that's whats happening?
I love the fact that he says he likes doing issues that will hopefully "slap you in the face". I find that art, at least for me, has to have a purpose in my life and make me and others consider the work as more than just beauty framed on a wall. When he says how he did a work about alcoholism (which is about his brothers problem with alcohol) i think it really shows that he truly feels an obligation to the world to make this issues known, and at such a personal level! I really liked his honesty in his interview and his sarcasim when he talks about the Indian piggy bank sculpture.
We were supposed to find his actual works on that site because i couldn't find them...

Nate S said...

I like how his artwork always has meaning to him. Whether or not it means anything to someone else. I'm not someone who can just produce a piece of art. Even if it's just realism I always sneak some meaning into a piece(whether or not i'll admit it) I respect the fact that he lets who he is be reflected in his artwork. I always think you can tell a lot about someone by the art that they produce. I want to see some of these prints that he's talking about...sound cool

Olivia said...

Many times I struggle with finding something that really means a lot to me personally. I admire Haozous for his ability to represent himself. He said, "My work is just a self portrait of myself, and then I put it out there." I think I am afraid to put myself out there for all to see. I hope to have his courage someday and be willing to risk it all to express myself.

p.s. Monday/Wednesday Print makers, don't forget we are having a German Theme day tomorrow!!! SO wear you lederhosen!

Lisa Ulik said...

Haozous is definitely no Selifan...

The range of content and media which Haozous tackles in his work is awe inspiring. I especially liked his watercolor and ink drawings and his photographs (nudes). They raise many haunting questions surrounding familiarity and unfamiliarity of figurative forms, stereotypes, and marginalized cultures.

In reading his 2003 interview with Guy Cross (on his website), I was most moved by his position that we create our own invisible [cultural] barriers. Also, great to further read how he has always worked to inspire questions about cultural identity and purpose... rather than be a decorator or illustrator. This is important. It is a position vital to the existence of the idea alive within the work... beyond its materiality... separating it from craft or object alone... making the art sort of the expressed birthplace of the greater and more profound meaning or awareness provoked from it.

Shawn said...

content content content! his content is all about him and what he is about! i feel he has a great connection with himself as an artist and he knows how to express himself in a wonderful way!

Jaime said...

I really enjoyed reading about Bob Haozous and his work. My computer wouldn't let me see any of the images so i had to google them but from what I see there definitely give a large impact. I liked when Haozous said "My work is just a self portrait of myself, and then I put it out there." I really like how his work represents himself and his culture.

Britt Vogt said...

I love that Bob likes to hide clues in his work. I think it's the artists own personal joke, and it is fun when someone finds those clues in your own work. Small symbols can also completely change the intended meaning of the work. It also shows his integrity as an artist that he draws the content for his work from his heritage, and that he feels a certain obligation to do that is understandable. It is also quite the parody Bob honors his heritage through his art, while right here in LaCrosse we are celebrating the areas rich German heritage through the Octoberfest...

Becky said...

I went to bobhaozous.com and really enjoyed looking through the collections of his work. With so much symbolism I found it easy to make up my own little stories/meanings behind his sculptures. What I liked the most about his work was how typical Native American objects were created with not so conventional materials, like Bob’s “Lodge”. The use of barbwire for the lodge made the structure feel less like a cultural meeting place and more like a prison camp.

zoe said...

I really enjoyed reading the meanings Haozous has placed in his artwork. I couldn't see the images as I read it, but it didnt matter.. it was pretty fascinating to read about how much thought has gone into each of his works, and to imagine what they might look like on my own. When I finally got to see the sculptures they looked much different than i had imagined, but I could still see that they could be conveying the messages he was hoping to convey.. in the end it almost doesnt matter if other people can see what he meant just by viewing his art.. its almost more enlightening when people completely miss the message -- just goes to show how ignorant we all are in general-- we only see what we want to see.

AnnCreates87 said...

I really enjoyed what he had to say. I too really liked what he said about doing art that slaps you in the face because it slaps him. I have a real connection with that, that's what I like to do with my art because I feel like it brings to light the truths that people want to ignore, or wish not to see.

This art isn't just for him, it's for his culture, for his people which is really great. Do more artists need to consider that? Tell the stories of people they are connected to, tell the story of their culture?

Joanne said...

i love that his work is all about content. and the whole 'slap you in the face thing'. i don't really get interested in art for just the sake of doing art, it has to have meaning and power behind it.

speaking of being slapped in the face... i believe oktoberfest slapped me in the face this weekend with a sprained ankle. bummer.

Kaitlynn said...

i think my favorite part about this person is that he's a story teller. each piece has a purpose and story to get you through it. i especially liked the story about the buffalo sculptures that had bullet holes in them. i love that he went about it so that the people buying it didnt realize they were participating in the destruction of the buffalo by purchasing it. brilliant.

kreger.anni said...

I wasn't able to view the pictures as I was reading, and when I found his website and looked at some of his stuff, it wasn't how I imagined it to be. I think that's what is so great about all the meaning he has put into these, you hear the description and each person gets a different image in their mind.
I think that it's amazing how he has such a range of differences in his artwork. For instance, some of his pieces such as Prisioner and Freedom Man seem very gestural and organic while pieces like Apache Skull and Hohokum seem very ridgid and geometric.
The fact that his work has such close ties with his ancestory is very impressive to me. I have a hard time putting a ton of feeling or meaning into some of my artwork, I guess I could take a hint from Mr. Haozous!
p.s. I regret to inform you that I won't be in class Tuesday, I have a Dr. apt.
haha gastpans

Ben Clark said...

It's always important for an artist to know where they're coming from in terms of their art. When you use your medium as a way of expressing something that is either deeply personal to you or simply trying to display an idea that can be felt across a wide variety of people, the pieces and their statements will always leave an impression. Definitely something to strive for. Also, I was out of town this weekend (wedding for some friends) and unfortunately, didn't get to see any authentic Leiderhosen donned for the weekend.

Mingo said...

It is a hard thing to be able to have the whole weight on his shoulders for his culture, a responsibility that I could not own up to, but one that he embraces.

Being caucasian it is hard for me and us to understand the exact pain that American Indians have gone though, and I find it always inspiring to see artist create pieces of work based on their culture. Although I have know that our depiction of American Indians was a sad and very poor one, it was still a bit of a shock to think that we romanticise their life and tend to focus on the good parts to hid the fact of what has been done to them.

I find Bob's piece of the Native Indian's bust as a piggy bank a very unique piece. To me it says that while she is something pretty to look at, people see her as simply a container, having money possibly remind people of the steriotypical remark that Indians have casinos, but her meaning more than that; people being to blinded my her outerappearance that they forget about what has possibly happened to her...perhaps she is hollow because people have forgotten

Jess said...

I was also unable to see his work along with the article so I started searching for more of his work. While looking on his website I found a very interesting sculpture, "Untitled (Turtle Face)". I tried to find more information behind the piece to understand it more. This made me realize that Bob Haozous had captured me like he had others by making you question the piece and try and figure it out. I thought it was neat but am still dissapointed that I couldnt find any information on it.

Jessalyn said...

I love how he did his work, not for the chance to make money, but to reflect what was really happening around him. He could have done "Native American-ish" art and it would have sold, but that wasn't the statement he wanted to make. His message to the world was more important than money.

I especially loved his message about nature and how misuse it. We reach out to manipulate mother earth and don't really like her unless she is pretty.

ellen said...

some very interesting work. coolness.

Kirky B said...

His works are so full of passion and conviction and you can tell that he produces art as means of expressing things that are important to him. Plus his monoprint is pretty great. Im really drawn to the use of color.

I found some more Chagall etchings that I found rather interesting.

http://www.spaightwoodgalleries.com/Pages/Chagall_Dead_Souls.html

Kirky B said...

ps. Awesome comment, Shining!

Mallory_Heesch said...

I really loved the part of the interview when he talked about painting these artificial clouds in his friend's gallery to represent how we dont want nature unless it's pretty. As is true with all artists, his pieces have deeper meaning than just being something visually pleasing. I also really like how it's a transcript of a presentation that he gave about his art... I dont think we get enough exposure to how other artist talk about their art, and therefore, how we should be talking about our art.

Cedarose said...

His artwork is blunt, but tactiful at the same time. Where the people looking at it don't realize what it's really about, when it is a rather crude or difficult to talk about issue. He is interested in honesty without polished bu-sht. He is willing to not only reveal the grotesque reality imposing on the Native American community, but also the difficult issues within his own culture. This last point I really admire, I have wanted to honestly talk about my own culture, but am afraid of causing disrespect to those I love who are a part of my culture. Writing this it has dawned on me that maybe genuine honesty doesn't have to cause disrespect to anyone. There are just so many things that I choose not to talk about. At the same time, I am filled with happiness and gratitude in the goodness of this life, so why focus on the minor negativities, it seems spoiled for me.

Johnson said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Johnson said...

As everyone else has commented, I really appreciate the fact that all of his works reflect who is he, what he has seen, and even some are a study of how he feels about the earth and world around him. I struggle with those concepts while creating my own art. I feel art should have some meaning behind it, rather than being purely asthetic, yet I feel my pieces merely reflect what is only seen through the eyes. I really enjoyed reading how Bob came to his conclusions and found his inspirations through past and current culture. I think after reading this, and the after the events this weekend, I have found some inspiration for my own work

Sarah said...

His content is so deeply rooted and is very personal. This should be motivation for all of us this semester when looking at the issue of justice...
When content is strong, your more invested in your art, and only positive results can occur....

the Sheriff said...

What I love is the fact that every piece of work truly means something to him as and artist and most importantly as a human being. I think putting your heart and soul into a piece of work and have it sell millions would be great... i also think that putting your heart and soul into a piece that doesnt make it past your own bedroom wall because no one wants it is even more rewarding. Make art to express not to make money. Guys like this give me the drive to keep doing what I believe in.

willison said...

I like how he always seems to throw a lot of meaning into each piece of his, even if its subtle. Even the smallest of details often have relevance and meaning in them. I also looked up drawings of his, and found them very impressive. I found a lot of them to be very beautiful in their accuracy, opposed to making them beautiful with ideals, something that I appreciate. Along with these drawings, I found a quote “I'm surprised that the drawings I did are still the foundation of my thoughts and work today in 2009.” Just proving how important it is to keep up with this form of art even if it is not your main focus, because it will probably always help you! Sometimes I find myself going for long periods of time without even sketching, and then immediately try to correct it. I believe this was a theme from Joel last sememster, draw draw draw!

SeeYa said...

I love his artwork. Everything that I saw on bobhaozous.com was very cool. It is so cool that his artwork shows who he is and where it all comes from. I truely beilieve that when you make things that have a strong meaning or story behind it it will always turn out great.

TonY Vang said...

critique was good. glad to see all u guy's works. :) . i'm proud of you all.

Jon Vitkus said...

you can really see bob's passion for art and passion for his subject. very inspiring.