The epic tale of the University of Wisconsin LaCrosse Printmaking Program. The Printmaking program is directed by Joel Elgin and features the odd collection of the many PrintFools who enroll, print and exist from semester to semester in the Shop of Tears.

Sunday, September 16, 2007

The people PRINT

The Drunk
George Bellows, 1882-1925.
Second state. Lithograph.

Some strong images but an odd Library of Congress effort at an exhibition. Hit the title of the post to link, take a look little printfools and say what you have to say...

23 comments:

Meagan said...

George Bellows had a lot to say in this lithograph. It's very powerful to me. I really like how the image does not look very linear, I would like to learn how to make my image on the stone a little less linear.

DaniL said...

WOW, so many amazing prints!!! I really like the emphasis on everyday people, and bringing art into everyone's lives instead of making it accessible only to certain people. All of the lithos were fantastic. I think my favorite is a toss up between the Mabel Dwight and Joseph Hirsch. The print from martin Lewis blew my mind, too-that is some incredible aquatinting.

Don't forget tomorrow's theme day, Monday-wednesday types! Socially responsible artist day. Bring in anything having to do with a social issue you're interested in-you can wear something, bring in a book/article/CD, whatever. It's pretty open ended, so you can't really fuck it up unless you don't bring anything in.

Now watch me forget to bring something in. No, I won't really.

libbyhansen said...

I love the pointed realities of these prints. The dramatic lighting, the realness of the scenes, and what each of them say to the people. The one that hits home for me is "The Drunk". A little too all familiar of when I was a child. Good man, bad habit. I'm sure each of these prints touches each of us in some inner personal way. Now we all need to express and say something as these fine artists have...

Christine said...

These amazing prints makes me wish I had taken litho instead of intaglio. Alas! The theme goes along with our semester theme of social issues. I can relate to this issue more than others. It gives me ideas on a direction to take in my own work.

Erin #3 said...

These prints have a very similar feel to them ... they all have that dark, "charcoally" feel to them ... sorry for the weird adjective ... I could definately tell that they were all from the 1912-48. ... I really liked how some had the very contrasting darks and lights as used in "lunch hour", "in the crowd", and "boss of the block" (one of my favorites)

I know that I am not in litho but this proposes a challenge for my own "baby" works

Anonymous said...

I appreciate the idea of socially responsible / active art. For me, the poinant element of this concept is the record of time. This exhibit is appealing to me because of this. So many different windows into the basic and the routine of lives all over the globe. The etching and aquatine(?) of Boss of the Block drew me in. The almost silloetted women was great - her size, posturing say as much about that time period as the city scape behind her.

Liv Radke said...

I am impressed by the quality of the work. As a baby, I have a question. Do all litho look like pencil drawings? I'm not sure of the style, but I have been impressed by the examples I have seen. I like how the artists have taken full advantage of light and darkness. They have been able to create a mood for their work, which I feel is instilling their message. The children in the image also moved me, because sometimes they are hurt the most, and it was very powerful to see them cowering in the corner.

Bec★ said...

awesome litho by Joseph Hirsch on that page as well! i like the "fuzziness" of the lines and the depth they illustrate. very cool :)

No Name said...

The first thing I did was scroll down and see which print stuck out to me. And it was definitely Lunch Hour by Joseph Hirsch. I loved the contrast in his work. I am a fan of the litho style from what I've been seeing lately. I'm very jealous of those in it this semester.

Nels said...

I appreciated how the artists of different nations all use their medium to make contact with the daily lives of their fellow citizens, and to point out the ways in which their government has failed them. Having said that my favorite was "Boss of the Block" by Martin Lewis. The strong will of the woman comes through very, very well!

lachness said...

Going along with was Danielle mentioned I like the theme of common people. All of these artists are addressing issues threw images of people in there every day lives. I think this allows the viewer to relate better to the image and understand the statement they are trying to make. ps.I didn't know Rivera did prints??
pss. hat day tuesday!!

Anonymous said...

There is a lot emotions coming from the works. It is just amazing to see how the artist captured very meaningful ideas into them. Gearge Bellows print and the lunch hour are amazing with the detail and the values that are used. The art really portrays history, the time period, but most of all the suffering and abuse that was going on in society at that time.

Sarah said...

I especially like the prints: In the Crowd and Boss in Black. The large range of value in these prints pop out for me. I enjoy looking at the people print collection and seeing how everyday events of common people are portrayed... many different ways to attack the artistic responsibility.

Katelin said...

Wow that print is so complicated! Now that I kind of have an idea of what it would take to create a plate like that I bet it took forever! Pretty sure the artist could have used some Icy Hot when he was done :)

mao said...

These prints are amazing. I love the details in the hands of the sleeping figure in Lunch Hour. I like that "White expressed his desire to use art as a weapon to "say what I have to say" and "fight what I resent."'

Caitlin said...

I like so many of these!
I love the softness of "Nino con Taco", the contrast and boldness of "Boss of the Block", the photo-like quality of "From Arkansas", but my favorite is probably "Lunch Hour", I love the hands and shadows, and the softness.

lachness said...

SIDE COMMENT: Just wanted to let everyone know that I put up a couple examples of "socially responsible artists" on my blog South African Female Artists.. excuse the grammer, i'm working on it
There is a link on my lachness10 blog or you can go directly www.southafricaresearch.blogspot.com

ptb said...

did this work? am i on the freakin blog now? if not, becca, i will be needing some help please.

the prints are very cool... i am excited to learn how to make my lines blend like on these prints.

carly d said...

I am starting to get excited about his social responsible artist thing. Printmaking seems like the perfect medium to express our social and political discust...you can make so many copies!

As some of my brothers and sisters mentioned in earlier postings their favorites were "Lunch Break" and "Boss of the Block", I would have to agree. I am amazed by the quality of a litho print. They look so much like drawings.

Damnit I am sad that I am not in litho. I've peeked at some of the stones in the shop of love and I am a little bit green eyed. Wish I was drawing on stones with you all.

carly d said...

www.truthout.org

this is real news.

check it my brothers and sisters

Trin said...

These prints really convey one emotion or another. The detail in "Lunch Hour" is amazing. But I love to see the various styles within each of the prints, like the difference between "Weighing Fish" and "In the Crowd".

mai ia said...

All of these prints are very impressive.The more I read and looked at the images, the more intimidating they all seem because of the very strong content and meaning that they all had.

Jen said...

These prints are amazing. They are emotionally charging, and so meaningful. I really liked "Lunch Hour" I could look at it for hours; it is so realistic. I like how all the prints look like actual drawings. It is very inspiring.